Stanford University & Hope for a Hearing Loss Cure

“In the last five years the pharmaceutical industry has woken up and there are now about 30 biotech companies right now focused on finding a cure for some forms of hearing loss.” – Prof. Stefan Heller

It may well be the most comprehensive and ambitious research program of its kind and the Stanford Initiative to Cure Hearing Loss (SICHL) mission statement reflects that:

“The goal of the Stanford Initiative to Cure Hearing Loss is to devise treatments that repair the damaged ear and restore lost hearing, quiet tinnitus, and improve balance.”

How far have they come toward achieving that goal? Continue reading “Stanford University & Hope for a Hearing Loss Cure”

FDA Fast Tracks Review of AM-111

More hope on the horizon for those of us suffering from sensorineural hearing loss.  Auris, a Swiss biopharmaceutical company, is developing a promising drug called AM-111.

It’s now in clinical trials and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just approved it for a “Fast Track” designation.  That means it will now undergo a speeded up review process.

I will be following this development closely.  More reports to come. Meanwhile, here’s the company’s press release:

Continue reading “FDA Fast Tracks Review of AM-111”

A Breakthrough in Curing Hearing Loss?

Another promising development in research into restoring hearing.

The key to restoring lost hearing is finding a way to re-grow hair cells in the cochlea.  We’re born with about 30,000 of these tiny sound detectors and because of exposure to noise, age and some types of antibiotics they die off.

The good news: researchers around the world are working to develop techniques to regenerate hairs cells.  Now comes word that a team at MIT, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Massachusetts Eye and Ear have discovered a combination of drugs that does just that.  At least it works in mice.

The MIT press release and another from Brigham and Women’s Hospital have some of the details about the research that was published in the scientific journal The Cell Reports.

For more on the search for a cure check out my posts on CFG166, research at Sunnybrook in Toronto and the Pasteur Institute in Paris.

 

Great Video Explains Hearing Loss

Do you want to know why you are losing your hearing?   This short video explains clearly and simply what is happens to your auditory system as age, noise and disease take their toll.  Highly recommended.

A couple of notes:  It was produced by Signia (formerly Siemans), a hearing aid maker.  And I have turned on the closed captions.

CGF166 – The Latest News

“There have been a couple patients with hearing improvement, so we are definitely encouraged.” – Dr. Lawrence Lustig

There is no cure for sensorineural hearing loss, the type that most of us with aging ears suffer from.  At least not yet.  But as I’ve written about in earlier posts, a pioneering treatment may be on the way.  It’s called CGF166.  It’s the only gene therapy for hearing loss now undergoing human trials in the U.S. and early reports are promising.  Here’s a progress report. Continue reading “CGF166 – The Latest News”

Wearing a Halo

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic” – Arthur C. Clarke

There is no good time to suffer from hearing loss but there’s no better time than now for being able to cope and compensate.  The technology of today’s hearing aids truly does seem like magic.

If you want proof put on a pair of Starkey‘s Halo2s.  First, their bluetooth connectivity is remarkable.  That should come as no surprise.

Starkey’s ELI (2005)

Back in 2005 Starkey introduced ELI, the world’s first bluetooth enabled hearing aid.  (That was two years before the iPhone was unveiled.)  So they have a lot of experience to build on.

As you can see on the left, ELI was an ungainly looking device.  Note the dangling black cube which was the bluetooth radio.

Their latest model the Halo2 is, by comparison, light and sleek.  Thanks to 12 years of miniaturization, the bluetooth radios are tucked inside out of sight along with a set of powerful microprocessor chips.  It’s a smart hearing aid designed for smart phones.

Continue reading “Wearing a Halo”

Bluetooth and a Birthday

Smartphone apps have changed the way we cope with hearing loss. What’s next?

This is an auspicious day for those of us with hearing loss.  Steve Jobs likely wasn’t thinking much about hearing aids when he stood on stage ten years ago and held up that very first iPhone.

January 9, 2007

As he touted its revolutionary features he made a passing reference to its bluetooth capability. At the time bluetooth was used primarily to connect mobile phones with car systems and earpieces.

A decade, and one billion iPhones later, bluetooth now puts the power to connect, control and adjust hearing aids in the palm of your hand.  Every major hearing aid maker now offers bluetooth apps for both iPhones and Android devices.

So what’s next? Continue reading “Bluetooth and a Birthday”

World’s Best Hearing Aid Ads

Time for a little lighter fare.  Here’s a selection of print and billboard ads for hearing aids from around the world.  Some are funny, some are bizarre and there’s one I don’t get at all.

  • Saucy Widex ad (New Zealand)

 

 

Mind Reading Hearing Aids?

Connecting your hearing aids and your brain.

What’s going on between your ears when you’re losing your hearing? Emerging research is beginning to give us some revealing, and disturbing answers about brain function and hearing loss.  But it also offers some hope.

brain-scan
Credit: Anu Sharma

First the bad news:  Take a look at this picture.

On the left, is the brain of a person with normal hearing and the areas that process sound are lit up as they should be.  But on the right is the brain of a person with mild hearing loss.  As you can see there’s less activity and what there is has shifted to other areas. Continue reading “Mind Reading Hearing Aids?”